Jackson Msimbe & Sabrina Mirabal

By Jerry Jimenez, Navy Office of Community Outreach

October 28, 2021

Hollywood & Pembroke Pines Natives Take Pride in Serving Their Country

Petty Officer 1st Class Jackson Msimbe, a native of Hollywood, Florida, is serving with the U.S. Navy’s cutting-edge maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft squadron in Oak Harbor, Washington.

Msimbe joined the Navy 11 years ago. Today, Msimbe serves as an aviation electronics technician.

“Pretty much I was recruited out of college,” said Msimbe. “I was attracted by the education benefits and the opportunity of traveling around the world. I wanted a career path, something that would be stable for my future.”

Msimbe serves with Maritime Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven, a high-tech maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron tasked with monitoring the world’s oceans in the state-of-the-art P-8A “Poseidon.”

Msimbe attended Miami Jackson Senior High School and graduated in 2004. Today, Msimbe uses skills and values similar to those found in Hollywood.

“Growing up the biggest thing was the cultural diversity,” said Msimbe. “It helped to bring these lessons to the Navy. When I joined the Navy, I was able to work with people from different walks of life.”

These lessons have helped Msimbe while serving in the Navy supporting the P-8 Poseidon mission.

The P-8 Poseidon mission is to conduct maritime patrol and reconnaissance as well as long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare and intelligence gathering missions. They deploy around the globe to monitor the world’s oceans wherever they are needed.

The P-8A Poseidon, the Navy’s newest maritime, patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, is a replacement aircraft for the legacy P-3C “Orion”. According to Navy officials, leveraging the experience and technology of the successful P-3C “Orion” with the needs of the fleet, the P-8A is designed to be combat-capable, and to improve an operator’s ability to efficiently conduct anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

Serving in the Navy means Msimbe is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

“We keep the water safe and the freedom of navigation contributes to economic prosperity back home,” said Msimbe.

With more than 90 percent of all trade traveling by sea, and 95 percent of the world’s international phone and internet traffic carried through fiber optic cables lying on the ocean floor, Navy officials continue to emphasize that the prosperity and security of the United States is directly linked to a strong and ready Navy.

According to Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday, four priorities will focus efforts on sailors, readiness, capabilities and capacity.

“For 245 years, in both calm and rough waters, our Navy has stood the watch to protect the homeland, preserve freedom of the seas, and defend our way of life,” said Gilday. “The decisions and investments we make this decade will set the maritime balance of power for the rest of this century. We can accept nothing less than success.”

Msimbe and other sailors have many opportunities to achieve accomplishments during their military service.

“I'm most proud of attaining my master's degree in health care administration using the Navy tuition assistance program, while still doing my job as an aviation electronics technician and while on sea duty,” said Msimbe. “I'm also proud of being selected for the 2019 in the Arena award.”

As Msimbe and other sailors continue to train and perform the missions to support national defense, they take pride in serving their country in the United States Navy.

“To me, serving in the Navy means sacrifice,” added Msimbe. “It's a great opportunity to serve others and be humble and develop yourself to have a bright future. It's not about me, it's about others.”


Sabrina Mirabal

Petty Officer 3rd Class Sabrina Mirabal, a native of Pembroke Pines, Florida, serves the U.S. Navy aboard the guided-missile destroyer operating out of Everett, Washington.

Mirabal joined the Navy two years ago. Today, Mirabal serves as a sonar technician aboard USS Sampson based in Everett, Washington.

“I joined the Navy for new beginnings and opportunities,” said Mirabal.

Mirabal attended Charles W. Flanagan High School and graduated in 2019. Today, Mirabal uses skills and values similar to those found in Pembroke Pines.

“I learned that everyone deserves the benefit of the doubt and the chance to do better,” said Mirabal.

These lessons have helped Mirabal while serving aboard USS Sampson.

A Navy destroyer is a multi-mission ship that can operate independently or as part of a larger group of ships at sea. The ship is equipped with tomahawk missiles, torpedoes, guns and a phalanx close-in weapons system.

More than 300 sailors serve aboard USS Sampson. Their jobs are highly specialized, requiring both dedication and skill. The jobs range from maintaining engines to handling weaponry along with a multitude of other assignments that keep the ship mission-ready at all times.

Serving in the Navy means Mirabal is part of a team that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

“We contribute to national security by using diplomacy to rally allies and isolate threats,” said Mirabal.

Mirabal and other sailors have many opportunities to achieve accomplishments during their military service.

“I am super proud of graduating from sonar technician school and doing a job I care about,” said Mirabal.

As Mirabal and other sailors continue to train and perform the missions to support national defense, they take pride in serving their country in the United States Navy.

“It's a very interesting stepping stone in my life," added Mirabal. "It has created a new outlook in life."